Pacific Cancer Programs

Guam Comprehensive Cancer Control Program

Vision and Mission:

“The people of Guam will be cancer free, embracing a healthy lifestyle and living in a healthy environment.”

Numerous efforts exist in Guam to address the challenges presented by cancer. These efforts span the cancer continuum and address ways to prevent, detect, treat and sustain the best possible quality of life for all individuals. The Guam Comprehensive Cancer Control Coalition functions under the premise that no single organization or agency can address cancer alone. Rather, a collaborative approach with community buy-in and key stakeholders working together to identify problems and create solutions will result in more efficient and effective use of cancer resources. The GCCCC believes it is through the coordination of efforts that disparities and gaps will be identified and underserved populations will be cared for.

The GCCCC has identified it as their mission to reduce cancer incidence and mortality on Guam through collaboration of public and private stakeholders. As the Coalition moves forward in their cancer control efforts, their work is guided by the following Core Values:

  • Respect: We respect opinions, each other and value the unique perspective that each individual brings.
  • Collaboration: We will work together, not against each other for solutions.
  • Innovation: We keep an open-mind for creative ways tosolve problems.
  • Impact: Our work will have positive impact on thecommunity.
  • Commitment: We are committed to evidenced-basedComprehensive Cancer Control that ccontinually engages the community.
  • Trust:We trust one another to act with integrity andin good faith.

Primary Goals

In the Guam Comprehensive Cancer Control Plan for 2013-2017, the Cancer Coalition identified the following major goals:

  • Prevent and reduce exposure to cancer risk factors.
  • Detect all cancers at the earliest stage.
  • Enhance the quality of life for cancer survivors.
  • Improve the collection and dissemination of quality, cancer- related data for Guam.
  • Promote a social and policy environment that is conducive to healthy lifestyles.

If you would like to know more information regarding the Guam CCC Coalition and Program, please Like their Facebook Page by clicking >HERE<.

Guam Background

The island of Guam is the largest and southernmost island of the Mariana Islands. Guam is a melting pot that reflects the cultures of its original Chamorro inhabitants and the influences of European, American, Asian, Micronesian, and other people who have occupied, visited and immigrated to Guam since the 16th Century.

Guam has an ancient history and rich cultural heritage. The indigenous people of Guam, Chamorros, are widely believed to have been of Indo-Malaya descent sharing linguistic and cultural similarities to Malaysia, Indonesia and the Philippines. Guam’s first contact with the West occurred in 1521 with the visit of Ferdinand Magellan. The island was formally claimed by Spain in 1565 and Jesuit missionaries arrived in 1668 to establish their brand of European civilization, Christianity and trade. During this period, the Catholic Church became the focal point for village activities and Guam became a regular port-of-call for the Spanish galleons that crisscrossed the Pacific Ocean.

Guam was ceded to the United States the Spanish American War in 1898. The island was formally purchased from Spain in 1899. Under the administrative jurisdiction of the United States Navy, Guam experienced many improvements in the areas of agriculture, public health, sanitation, education, land management, taxes, and public works. The U.S. Navy continued to use Guam as a refueling and communication station until 1941, when the island fell to invading Japanese forces shortly after the attack on Pearl Harbor. Guam remained under Japanese occupation until reclaimed by American forces in July 1944. In 1949, President Harry S. Truman signed the Organic Act, making Guam an unincorporated territory of the United States with limited self-governing authority, which it remains to this day.

Guam is a cosmopolitan community with a unique culture, the core of which is Chamorro with heavy influences as a result of Spanish occupation and the Catholic Church. American influence is evident in regard to celebration of public holidays and the form of government. Guam's culture has also been influenced and enriched by Filipino, Japanese, Korean, Chinese and Micronesian immigrants.

In 2000, 42% of the population were full or part Chamorro (Guam’s indigenous people), 26% were Filipino and 7% were Caucasian and just over 1% were Black/ African American. Other Asians (i.e., Chinese, Japanese, Korean, etc.) constitute nearly 8% of the population, while Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islanders (i.e., Carolinian, Chuukese, Kosraean, Marshallese, Palauan, Pohnpeian, Yapese and Other Pacific Islander) make up over 6%. Overall, over 82% of Guam’s population is of Asian or Pacific Islander ethnicity.

The total population of Guam based on July 2007 estimates is 173,456 with a growth rate of 1.43% and a total life expectancy of 78.58 years (male: 75.52 years; female: 81.83 years). The average life expectancy at birth on Guam at the time of the 2000 Census was 76.9 years which was nearly identical to that of the U.S. at 77.0.

The official languages of Guam are English and Chamorro. However, because of a diverse population, Philippine dialects, other Pacific island languages and other Asian languages are used throughout the community.

The capital of Guam is Hagatna. Guam is located approximately 3,700 miles west of Hawaii and 1,300 miles southeast of Japan with a total land area of 541.3 sq km, approximately one third the size of Washington, DC.

The island's rapid economic development was fueled both by rapid growth in the tourism industry as well as increased U.S. Federal Government spending during the 1980s and 1990s. The Asian economic crisis of the late 1990s, which impacted Japan had severely affected Guam tourism. Military cutbacks in the 1990s also disrupted the island's economy. The island's economic recovery was further hampered by devastation from Super typhoons Paka in 1997 and Pongsona in 2002, as well as the effects of the September 11 terrorist attacks on tourism. The economy depends largely on US military spending and tourism. Total U.S. grants, wage payments, and procurement outlays amounted to $1.3 billion in 2004. Over the past 30 years, the tourist industry has grown to become the largest income source following national defense.

Approximately a third of Guam is controlled by the U.S. military, which maintains naval and air force bases on island. Currently, there are about 14,000 service members and family members on Guam. Over the next five years, an estimated 8,000 U.S. Marines will be relocated to Guam from Okinawa, Japan. According to the U.S. Government Accountability Office's Report (September 2007), the Guam military buildup population growth is estimated at 39,130 for service members and their families. This does not include long-term civilian workers needed to support the troops or influx of immigrants moving to Guam for opportunities as a result of Guam's military buildup. Those 39,130 people alone would increase the island's population of 171,000 by nearly 23%. However, there is an anticipated population growth of at least 15% within a window of 4 to 5 years for the construction phase. This growth will shift, meaning that initially it will comprise of construction related labor force. Once the construction phase is completed, the majority of that workforce will leave island and the military will eventually move to Guam over the next few years.

Comprehensive Cancer Control (CCC) Plan Download

Cancer Council of the Pacific Islands (CCPI) Members

Dr. John Taitano

Dr. John Taitano

  • Title: CCPI President
Roselie V. Zabala

Roselie V. Zabala

  • Title: Guam CCPI Director
  • Health Services Administrator
    Bureau of Professional Support Services

Contact Information

PACIFIC REGIONAL COMPREHENSIVE CANCER CONTROL PROGRAM (PRCCCP))

Lawrence Alam

Lawrence O. Alam

Bureau of Community Health Services
Department of Public Health & Social Services
Government of Guam
123 Chalan Kareta,
Mangilao, Guam 96913 - 6304

Vivian P. Pareja

Vivian P. Pareja

Bureau of Community Health Services
Department of Public Health & Social Services
Government of Guam
123 Chalan Kareta,
Mangilao, Guam 96913 - 6304

Jenny R. De Leon

Jenny R. De Leon

Bureau of Community Health Services
Department of Public Health & Social Services
Government of Guam
123 Chalan Kareta,
Mangilao, Guam 96913 - 6304

PACIFIC REGIONAL CENTRAL CANCER REGISTRY (PRCCR)

Melanie Montana

Melani Montano

  • Title: PRCCR Cancer Registrar
  • Email: mmontano@uguam.uog.edu
  • Tel: (671) 735-2988/89
  • Fax: (671) 734-2990
  • Address:

Cancer Research Center of Guam
House #7 Dean Circle, UOG Station
Mangilao, Guam 96923


Renata Bordallo

Renata Bordallo, MSW, CTR

  • Tel: (671) 735-2989/88
  • Fax: (671) 734-2990
  • Address:

Cancer Research Center of Guam
House #7 Dean Circle, UOG Station
Mangilao, Guam 96923


Roslynne Ebeo

Roslynne Ebeo

  • Title: Research Associate I/Data Collection Specialist
  • Email: rebeo@uguamlive.uog.edu
  • Tel: (671) 735-2988/89
  • Fax: (671) 734-2990
  • Address:

Pacific Regional Central Cancer Registry,
Cancer Research Center of Guam, UOG Station Dean Circle #7,
Mangilao, GU 96923

Dr. Robert L. Haddock

Dr. Robert L. Haddock (Epidemiologist)

  • Title: Guam Cancer Registry Director
  • Email: robhad@yahoo.com
  • Tel: (671) 735-2988/89
  • Cell: (671) 727-2627
  • Fax: (671) 734-2990
  • Address:

Cancer Research Center of Guam
House #7 Dean Circle, UOG Station
Mangilao, Guam 96923

Funding for this website was made possible by a cooperative agreement from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, through the following:
Pacific CEED, award #: 5U58DP000976, Pacific Regional Central Cancer Registry, award #: 5U58DP000835; Regional Comprehensive Cancer Control Program, award #: U55/CCU923887.
The views expressed on this site do not necessarily reflect the official policies of the Department of Health and Human Services;
nor does mention of trade names, commercial practices, or organizations imply endorsement by them or the U.S. Government.
Funding Sources: PRCCR: #: 5U58DP000835  | Pacific CEED: #: 5U58DP000976 | RCCC: #: U55/CCU923887 

Copyright © 2014 | Pacific Cancer Programs | All Rights Reserved